Category Archives: buoys

The Imperative of Love

This week, we return to our familiar motif of “inverted utopia”, a world wherein we cannot imagine the implications of our clever technologies. Such is the case in many reactions to climate catastrophe: fear not, we will invent new tech and engineer ourselves into a Green New Deal

Yet fixes that leave deep structures in place will have the same result as wrapping infected wounds with bandages without treating the infection. Without a fundamental change in the relationship between Homo Sapiens and the whole of life, ever more clever tinkering will only serve to deepen the crisis while feeding the toxic delusion that we are in control as rulers supreme. 

With this in mind, we turn to a a few passages from recent reflections made by Barbara Cecil in counterpoint to Dahr Jamail. Images are from the Sogetsu School of Ikebana.

 

 

Her closing sentence, which should be inscribed in the heavens:

The work of these times is not about saving the world but in belonging to it more fully.

 


This Blitzkrieg of Idiocy

Now come a few insights and questions from the ever-luminous Arundhati Roy, beginning with the opening paragraphs of her recent PEN America Speech.

Images are from the archive of Richard Long’s perambulatory text works.

 

 

 

 

Roy sharpened her focus on the most pressing issue of our time in a subsequent interview with Democracy Now:

 

 

 

 


From Rights To Obligations

Today, shares in a dystopic “gig economy” company (Uber) will be offered to a public apparently willing to swallow even the most outrageously distorted narrative.

Concurrently,  the CEO of one of the most toxic companies in history (Amazon) has announced his plan to “build a road in space”:  “Do we want stasis and rationing or do we want dynamism and growth? This is an easy choice. We know what we want. We just have to get busy.”

Oh my. A man apparently addicted to “getting busy.”

Earlier this week saw the release of a report documenting abundant evidence of accelerating extinction rates while craven officials licked their chops over the opportunity to drill drill drill; busy, busy, busy.

In the midst of this death dance of neoliberalism, we turn to a historian who has devoted a lifetime of research to recuperating and celebrating histories of resistance to the commodification of every living and dead thing: Peter Linebaugh.

Excerpts from a recent interview below, with images from Doris Salcedo’s “Shibboleth”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Law of Ecocide

This week, with much sadness, we take note of the untimely death of one of the most extraordinary environmental activists of our times: visionary barrister Polly Higgins.

Higgins devoted her life towards establishing ecocide as a crime against the whole of life on Earth. The following tribute by Satish Kumar, editor emeritus of Resurgence and Ecologist , underscores the deep significance of her life’s work:

 

 

Below, her proposed legal definition, relayed from Eradicating Ecocide. We also link to two videos, the first recording a conversation with Charles Eisenstein dating from 2013, the second a recent interview with Real Media.

 

 

 



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We note that as of this writing her death is still not mentioned on her website; that is as it should be, since her pioneering work will certainly be continued by her skilled and devoted legal team. Subsequent conviction of those responsible for the plunder and devastation of Earth’s ecosystems will be her lasting legacy.

 

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Ice Wisdom

Now comes Eskimo-Kalaallit Elder Angaangaq Angakkorsuaq, a traditional healer, storyteller and carrier of the Qilaut (winddrum). By his own account, his life mission and spiritual task, given to him by his mother, has been to “melt the ice in the heart of men”.

On his website, he writes:

 


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More wisdom from the speaking ice, as recorded in  a recent interview:

 

 

 

 

A MESSAGE TO HIS HOLINESS, POPE FRANCIS

 

For more on the spiritual crisis of environmental unravelling, we highly recommend the below video of a recent program at Harvard Divinity School, featuring both Angaangaq Angakkorsuaq and Nainoa Thompson:

 

 

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An Ecology of Intimacy

This week, we return to the voice of Leanne Simpson with excerpts from a longer essay published in 2016, critiquing the pseudo-reconciliation process launched by the “liberal” Trudeau government in Canada.

As Jill Stauffer so brilliantly demonstrates in her pioneering book Ethical Loneliness, a false reconciliation does nothing but retraumatize the victim while further entrenching the moral sanctimony of the perpetrator.

Images link to Simpson videos, also worthy of deep listening.

 

 

 

 

 

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Scaffoldings of Care

This week, we relay a passage from a remarkable conversation between two of the most indispensable writers in North America: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson and Dionne Brand.

Images link to videos by Simpson.

 

 

HOW TO STEAL A CANOE

 

 

UNDER YOUR ALWAYS LIGHT

 

 

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One of our (many) favorite passages from Brand’s searing Ossuaries:

 

 

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In the Fullness of Time

On this day when global youth join Greta Thunberg on strike to demand that inept elders terminate their oblivious fixation on short-term metrics like GDP growth, metrics that have become irrelevant within the rhythms of the Sixth Extinction, we turn to geologist Marcia Bjornerud in a recent interview about themes explored more thoroughly in her book, Timefulness: How Thinking Like A Geologist Can Help Save the World.

Images are sculptural drawings relayed from the studio of Phyllis Ewen, from a series titled Deep Time & Terrain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Not Afraid To Look

Now comes activist and historian Nick Estes, citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, with excerpts from an interview following the publication of his compelling new book, OUR HISTORY IS THE FUTURE.

Images are from an essay by Charles Rencountre, outlining the genesis of the powerful carved sculpture he and his partner Alicia created for Standing Rock, from which we borrow this week’s title.

 

 

LOOKING STRAIGHT AHEAD INTO THE EYE OF THE STORM WITH NO FEAR

 

 

NOT AFRAID TO LOOK FACES THE LAUNCH PAD OF THE DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE.

 

 

ON THE HILL ABOVE THE FORMER SITE OF THE SACRED STONE CAMP AT STANDING ROCK

 

About the sculpture, inspired by a pipe that shows a similar figure on the prow facing the head of a white man that serves as the pipe’s bowl, Rencountre writes:

 

 

As for pitting a pipe against the pipeline, he writes:

 

 

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Alive and Ensouled

Following a week that modulated between the trivial and the tragic, we turn our attention to a brief excerpt from Per Espen Stoknes’ remarkable Landscapes of Soul, dating from 1996, in which he tracks various myths of apocalypse, wildness and the city through history and human psychology.

We are grateful to DP correspondent Allen S. Weiss for directing our gaze to the work of Herbert Pföstl; two images below.

 

 

WILL NEVER RETURN

 

 

THE SKY STILL FARTHER AWAY

 

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Pföstl offers the following vita:

painter of animals, plants, and saints.

what is collected here in fields of broken color, excavated text, and tones of concealment are signs and relics; ordered as paper memorials to stones and plants, to animals and saints.

emblems of landscapes and lives gone from this world. they are laid side by side with care, almost botanically, and mostly on paper that is rarely larger than a page in an old book.

there is no wish to simulate or eclipse nature. embracing a slow alchemy of things, in drama without movement, these histories of last walks, epiphanies, and petitions are fragmentary by principle; their harmonies structured in silence.

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We will explore his exceptional body of work more thoroughly in a future DP.