Category Archives: buoys

Time to Listen

This week, reeling from relentlessly alarming data such as temperature change in the deep ocean, quadrillions of plastic fibers in the single state of California, and reports of the “dying sea ice” in the Arctic, we simply relay a voice of Amazonian indigenous leader Nemonte Nenquimo (pictured below) as she addresses the ignorant “leaders” of her region and the world in a recently published letter, excerpted below.

 

 

 

 

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In Widening Circles

This week, we bend our ears once again to the voice of esteemed elder Joanna Macy, in passages brought to our attention by DP correspondent Janet Coster, as found by her within Bill Plotkin’s Nature and the Human Soul. Images of Smithson’s drawings in the conceptual vicinity of Spiral Jetty added by DP.

 

 

 

 

 

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Let Us Hear the Crying

We are indebted to faithful DP correspondent Janet Coster, co-author of the deeply revelatory The Lure of the Ring, for sending us two quotes from Joanna Macy, as relayed from Bill Plotkin’s Nature and the Human Soul.

We further relay the first quote below, to be followed by the second next week. Image added by DP.

 

 

ALLISON SAAR, HADES D.W.P. (2016)

 

Next week: Widening Circles.

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Art Into Life

As wildfires continue their hungry devastation across California and Oregon, we have been re-reading Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, a spare yet powerful novel that we have always thought of as an anticipatory documentary narrative, describing a near future now in the process of presenting itself.

A favorite passage:

 

 

NOTHING TO SEE

 

And the closing passage:

 

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The Wood Demon

Now comes faithful DP correspondent Jon Swan with a few Chekhovian thoughts on life in the pyrocene. Captions to widely circulating images added by DP.

 

TINY HOUSE FOR WOOD DEMONS

 

 

POOF

 

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Zero Sum Obliteration

This week, we stay with Elaine Scarry and the Boston Review, via a 2011 interview following the publication of her book, Thinking in an Emergency. Her thoughts (excerpted below) resonate all the more strongly nine years later, within the context of our deepening ecological and political crisis. Images are self-explanatory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Limber Cruelty

During this week of commemoration, being 75 years since the United States dropped two bombs on overwhelmingly civilian populations in Japan, we turn to Elaine Scarry in the pages of the Boston Review.

The entire essay is worth a close read; excerpts below, with archival photos  added by DP.

 

FAT MAN

 

LITTLE BOY

[…]

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Words Into Being

This week, among the many books that have sustained us during CovidTimes, we celebrate the voice of Ocean Vuong, both in his “memoir” (in quotes because it is so much more than that!) and in his equally as exhilarating book of poems, Night Sky With Exit Wounds, a title we wish we had found ourselves.

In roaming through various interviews online, we are relieved to find the same exceptional qualities in dialogue with others. Excerpts from one of these (within the worthy On Being project) below, with images relayed from the studio of Chie Hitotsuyama.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Living the Fall

Now comes Greta Erlich with some of the most insightful and moving words ever written about glaciers, as wildfires continue to rage through the Siberian Arctic, in the midst of a record-shattering heat wave.

Her entire meditation can be found in the pages of the exceptionally worthwhile Orion magazine. Excerpts below, with images from Basia Irland’s revelatory Ice Books project.

 

 

 

 

 

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About her Ice Books, Basia Irland writes:

River water is frozen, carved into the form of a book, embedded with an “ecological language” or “riparian text” consisting of local native seeds, and placed back into the stream. The seeds are released as the ice melts in the current. Those who contribute to or participate in the Ice Book launches are determined by the location. Along the Nisqually River in Washington, for example, Nisqually Tribal Members, salmon restoration specialists, musicians, fifth graders attending WaHeLut Indian School, students and professors from Evergreen State College, Forest Rangers, all joined in the ice book launches. Participants in New Mexico on the Rio Grande have included artists, farmers, acequia majordomos, college students, professors, hydrologists, Pueblo members, and hundreds of interested watershed citizens.

Ice Receding/Books Reseeding emphasizes the necessity of communal effort and scientific knowledge to deal with the complex issues of climate disruption and watershed restoration by releasing seed-laden ephemeral ice sculptures into rivers. I work with stream ecologists, biologists, and botanists to ascertain the best seeds for each specific riparian zone. When an ecosystem is restored and the plants grow along the riverbanks they give back to us by helping sequester carbon, mitigating floods and drought, pollinating other plants, dispersing seeds, holding the banks in place (slowing erosion), creating soil regeneration and preservation, acting as filters for pollutants and debris, supplying leaf-litter (for food and habitat), promoting aesthetic pleasure, and providing shelter/shade for riverside organisms including humans.

 

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The Absent Emergency

In his recently published Being At Large, philosopher Santiago Zabala writes: “In the age of alternative facts, facts have also been framed, that is, stripped of all the interpretative, institutional, and social support they once could count on.”

Navigating an ever-expanding bog of information, detached from contextual grounding while being relentlessly politicized or infused with ideology requires a new sort of engaged hermeneutics to disrupt the authoritarian “call to order”.

Excerpts from a recent interview below, with images relayed from Nancy Cohen’s extraordinary installation, Hackensack Dreaming.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On her website, Nancy Cohen writes:

This installation is in no way meant to reproduce the landscape, my inspiration and reference point. I want the viewer to move through “Hackensack Dreaming” discovering and finding connections – compelled by the beauty and the strangeness. Thinking simultaneously of the made and found worlds – of nature (whatever that might be in an artist’s studio in 2014 in urban New Jersey) – a viewer might hopefully become temporarily lost in the contradictions and visual experience.

Such is the magnificent art that keeps up slogging through the info-bog here at DP.

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