How We Live

Now comes DP correspondent Joseph Jackson following a week during which the mainstream media have been flooded with stories of “green jobs”, massive wind farms and other delusions of technotopian hubris, intended to assure us that the deepening climate emergency can be resolved without the slightest change in how we live.

Advance excerpts from an essay-in-progress below, with a single image added by DP.

 

 

Geomorphic Symptomology For an Emerging Addiction

 

 

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In Light of the Rotten Moon

This week, we serve to amplify indigenous voices raised in opposition to the Nevada Thacker Pass lithium mine project.

First, an excerpt from the October 1 Press release:

 

 

Second, a more general statement from the People of Red Mountain. Images added by DP, relayed from the Protect Thacker Pass website:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How Long?

Now comes Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate, speaking at the Youth4Climate Conference Milan. The image links to a video, as relayed from Democracy Now.

The video also includes Greta Thunberg’s “Blah, Blah, Blah” speech, misleading as a transcript, but very clear and powerful via the video.

Neither Nakate nor Thunberg (nor the thousands of youth climate activists who later marched in the streets) are fooled by the feckless slogans and cynical accounting games presently masquerading as climate policy.

A few days after her speech and not far from Milan, Italy’s Genoa province experienced close to three feet of rain within 24 hours; a new European record, whatever that means.

How long shall the land mourn?

 

 

 

 


Back On Earth

We stay with The Ecological Citizen this week, with a plea from editor Eileen Crist to stop tying ourselves up in identity knots and stand solidly on the hard reality (and responsibility) of shared common ground. Image added by DP.

 

 

 

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In the Wake of the Horror

Now come the editors of the invaluable journal, The Ecological Citizen, with an appropriately blistering critique of Faroe Islander attempts to represent the indiscriminate slaughter of whales and dolphins (during a hunt known as The Grind) as “indigenous tradition”. Excerpts below.

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Fairy Creek

This week, we return again to the blockade at Fairy Creek via the voice of indigenous forest protector Kati George-Jim, interviewed yesterday on Democracy Now. Transcribed excerpts below.

 

 

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Below, a recent video missive from Fairy Creek, as relayed from a DP correspondent.

 

 


The Last Stand

The non-violent civil disobedience campaign to prevent the mercenary commodification of Vancouver Island’s last remaining remnants of ancient old-growth forest continues into a new season.

Now comes Pacheedaht Elder Bill Jones with a letter written several months ago, yet with every word ringing true today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A useful chronology here.

How to help.

 

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An Endlessly Storied World

Now comes Amitav Ghosh with an exceptionally timely essay in the forthcoming issue of Orion. The entire essay (and indeed this entire issue of a revitalized/radicalized Orion) is worthy of close attention.

The closing paragraphs excerpted below, with images relayed from the website of artist Scott Hocking, documenting his 2006 installation titled Animals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About the “Animals” installation, Hocking writes:

ANIMALS is a collaborative mixed media installation of over 40 painted fiberglass animals – a response to politically correct and decorative public art contests, hosted by cities and towns worldwide. Each animal is altered based on the circumstances or environment true to that animal, and then painted in an arbitrary pc manner.

 

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Hall of Mirrors

Within the cacophony of ill-informed, partisan and self-serving punditry relating to events in Afghanistan, we urge careful consideration of several lucid posts by Sarah Chayes, distinguished author of Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security and On Corruption In America — And What Is at Stake.

An excerpt from the most recent post below; image is by artist Kabir Mokamel, whose blast wall art (dating from 2015) scrutinized widespread corruption among both Afghan officials and foreign “contractors”.

 

 

 

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Listen To the Trees

We have recently returned from a Maine island sanctuary & reading retreat where we devoured books and local food in more or less equal abundance. Among the books, we highly recommend To Speak For the Trees by the brave and brilliant Diana Beresford-Kroeger.

We relay the introduction from the publisher’s website below, with a single image added by DP.

 

 

 

Tree Radio

 

 

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