Ghost Forest

Now comes artist Maya Lin with an NYC Madison Square installation created from forty-nine white cedar trees transplanted from the New Jersey Pine Barrens. The project raises numerous questions, both exposing and embracing an ethos of human dominion over nature.

Image and text relayed from the project’s website, followed by a link to a documentary video.

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Exterminate All the Brutes

Now comes film director Raoul Peck, creator of the miniseries titled after Sven Lindqvist’s remarkable yet fast forgotten masterpiece, published in 2007.

Excerpts from a recent interview below, with links to both the series trailer and a powerful statement of intent.

TRAILER
STATEMENT OF INTENT

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We Are What We Eat

Now comes Mark Bittman, author of the recently published Animal, Vegetable, Junk: A History of Food, from Sustainable to Suicidal.

Interview excerpts below, with images mirrored from the website of artist Pamela Michelle Johnson.

About her work, artist Pamela Michelle Johnson writes:

Teetering towers of hamburgers, drippy stacks of syrupy waffles, sticky piles of sugary candy… Junk food. It’s the taste of America. It is what we eat. It is who we are. The insatiable American appetite is set on a path of consumption. Devouring to the point where we are left with nothing, nothing but the consequential garbage. Quintessentially American, junk food is not just part of our diet, it epitomizes our cultural ideals and social norms. Through my work, I strive to invoke reflection on a culture focused on mass-consumption and mass-production, where the negative aspects of overindulgence are often forgotten or ignored. The work questions a culture that equates fulfillment, pleasure and happiness with what we consume.

Whether it is gluttonous quantities of larger than life junk food or the solitary empty wrapper, abandoned soon after devouring was complete, the images are charged with social relevance. The work flaunts our culture back at us. It questions embracing a culture of complete and instant gratification while ignoring the consequences of our indulgences. The work questions many of our cultural ideals and social norms. These are the pictures of our insatiable appetites; they are the pictures of the consequences. The heightened realism of these paintings serves to remind viewers that this is a mirror to our culture.

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The Red Deal

On the day after Earth Day, we relay the voice of Melanie Yazzie, Diné co-founder of The Red Nation, a grassroots Indigenous liberation organization, and assistant professor of Native American studies and American studies at University of New Mexico. Excerpts from yesterday’s Democracy Now interview below, with images of a Raven Portrait Mask by Janice Morin, mirrored from the Raven Makes Gallery.

The Red Nation Podcast features discussions on Indigenous history, politics, and culture from a left perspective.

Hell On Earth

Now comes animal rights activist and writer Laura Bridgeton with a cogent summary critique of ever-expanding factory farms, on land and sea. Her entire report is worth close consideration. Excerpts below, with images from the fecund imagination of “outsider” artist, James Castle.

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Apocalypseburg

This week, as we read about plans to expand the deep sea mining of minerals required for electric cars and other “green” consumables such that we might continue living in our human supremacist bubble, we urge consideration of a few prescient remarks from Srećko Horvat, a Croatian philosopher and the author of the recently published book, After the Apocalypse.

Images are relayed from the Lego website, marketing their new playtime scenario, Apocalypseburg.

HEY, WANNA DOOMSCROLL?

LADY LIBERTY INSIDE AN INVERTED UTOPIA

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I’M NET ZERO, WHO ARE YOU?

Exceptional Amnesia

Now comes the well-named environmental philosopher Melanie Challenger with an important new exploration of how human supremacism came to be the entrenched self-identity for “civilized” mammals within the less well-named species, Homo Sapiens.

An excerpt below, as relayed from the publisher’s website. Images from installations by Alisa Baremboym, relayed from her website, well worth a visit.

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An Imaginative Leap

While researching the poetics of radiophonic space, we came across an essay by the always stimulating Susan Griffin, first published in the Whole Earth Review in 1996, though it may as well have been written this morning.

The entire essay is worth consideration; excerpts below, with public domain images added by DP.

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That Still, Small Voice

Now comes Soul Fire Farm co-director and farm manager Leah Penniman, with two excerpts from a recent essay in prayer and praise for the gift of ecological humility vividly present within Black ecological thought, free from the death spiral of extractive white supremacism.

Images are relayed from the website of artist-scientist Juniper Harrower.

 

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About her interdisciplinary practice, Harrower writes:

As an ecologist and multimedia artist, I specialize in species interactions under climate change. I am greatly interested in the processes by which those interactions break down and their resulting environmental consequences, currently witnessed as massive species extinctions, forced migrations and the mistiming of biological events. Approaching these topics as an interdisciplinary researcher, I engage diverse communities on local and global issues to understand how ecological research that is connected to an arts practice can impact social change. […] The resultant symbolic representations and interdisciplinary narratives provide unexpected ways to engage with species and environments, encouraging a radical reimagining of our relationships as living beings on this planet.

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Unmasked

This week we bend our ears towards the Galician artist Isaac Cordal in conversation with LARB’s Brad Evans, convener of an exceptional ongoing series probing the subject of violence, in all its modulations.

Two excerpts below, with images from Cordal’s installation People of Trees, dating from the early days of the pandemic, relayed from his website.

 

 

 

 

 

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Let’s all repeat that last sentence together:

Creation and the solidarity it fosters may just be the only thing that save us.

 

 

 

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