Just Beyond Yourself

A frequent occurrence here at DP: we begin down one path in search of a particular voice, only to hear the call of some other being in an entirely different direction or dimension.

This week, we intended to reflect upon a few provocative utterances on the nature and culture of violence from the voice of Roy Scranton, yet we were led astray — happily, willingly — towards bells and blackbirds as embodied in the thought and poetry of David Whyte.

Two brief excerpts below, with images from a recent exhibition of “just beyond” works by the extraordinary Chiharu Shiota.

UNCERTAIN JOURNEY

REFLECTIONS ON TIME AND SPACE

In an earlier interview, Whyte expands on what it means to live at the frontier just beyond the self, with reference to his time as a marine biologist:

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Chiharu’s website provides the following artist profile:

Confronting fundamental human concerns such as life, death and relationships, Shiota explores human existence throughout various dimensions by creating an existence in the absence either in her large-scale thread installations that include a variety of common objects and external memorabilia or through her drawings, sculptures, photography and videos.

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Sacred Strides For Healing

Now comes roving DP correspondent Jon Swan:

Jon Swan is a poet, translator, and free-lance writer, whose articles on environmental issues have appeared in several magazines, including Tikkun. New and collected poems can be found on-line at jonswanpoems.  He and his wife live in Yarmouth, Maine.

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For an update on tribal legal eradication of the executive order to desecrate Bears Ears, we refer you to the Native American Rights Fund. Efforts by Earth Justice to obstruct the slaughter of Tongass Elders have also been successful —  so far.

For more strides towards the sacred, we also highly recommend the below linked video, a kinetic convergence of sacred energy against the infernal celebration of the mundane.

 

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FB = Filter Bubble

Now comes early Facebook investor Roger McNamee with concise, accurate and informed comments on the insidious, addictive nature of Facebook.

DP readers will be familiar with the critique, one that we explored in numerous posts. Yet the publication of McNamee’s ZUCKED brings fresh texture and personal details to a story that will end, in time, with the widespread rejection of Facebook by parents (FB is toxic), teens (FB is so uncool), and by legislators (FB is a corrosive threat to fundamental values within democracy).

Images are from promotional materials related to The Truman Show.

 

THUMBPRINT FOR A SURVEILLANCE ALGORITHM

 

 

PLEASE LIKE ME ON FB

 

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Revulsion Into Revolution

We are grateful to a longtime DP reader for steering us to a lucid interview with Eileen Crist, following the publication of her book Abundant Earth. A few excerpts below, interwoven with revolting images of clearcutting in four California counties, relayed from stopclearcuttingca.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She closes with a cautionary critique of reliance upon “hope”:

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In the category of revulsion in search of revolution, let us close with the below transcript from a recent press conference where the American style of environmentally catastrophic human supremacism was brazenly promoted to the rest of the planet.

MR. MULVANEY:

The focus of the event will be global growth and challenges to the global economy, specifically dealing with things like rejuvenating incentives for growth and prosperity; rolling back prosperity-killing regulations; ending trade barriers; and re-opening energy markets.  So, taking a lot of what we have been doing here domestically with such success and trying to encourage the rest of the world to get onboard as we sit here and our economy does so well.  You look all across the world right now, and the rest of the world is either at or near recession.  And we really do think that we have hit on a formula that works not only here but that would work overseas, where we take the G7 as the opportunity to try and convince other nations that they can have the same successes by following the same model.

 

Then during the Q & A, that mostly centered on how holding the G7 at a Trump-branded resort was not a naked conflict of interest:

 

MR. MULVANEY:  Okay.  Anybody else on G7?

Q    I got one more.  Is there any precedent in your studying of the G7 of a G7 Summit being held at a property owned by the President or a President?

And my second question is: As you’re looking at the content of what you want to do next year, it’s probably going to be hot in Florida in June.  Will climate change be one of the issues that you discuss?

MR. MULVANEY:  The first question is, no.  I don’t know if another President has ever done it.  I don’t know if another President has owned a property that was even considered for G7.  So, no, we haven’t — I don’t know the answer to that question.

Climate change will not be on the agenda.

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Message to Mr. Mulvaney and the Circle of Death for which he is a mouthpiece:

 

 

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Rebel For Life

This week, we simply relay select images from around the globe in strong support for the ongoing Extinction Rebellion:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This Great Choir

Now comes our fellow mountain rambler Robert Macfarlane with two brief excerpts from the exceptionally well-conceived magazine Emergence. As an intermezzo, we offer a link to a “border ballad” by Richard Skelton, whose music is one of the voices in “this great choir” that keeps us going here at DP.

 

 

CHOIR BLOCKAGE

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Beyond Politics

Media fixation on the increasingly toxic Washington soap opera detracts from another Friday of global strikes and protests undertaken by youth movements and their supporters in response to the Great Unravelling that is taking place at eco-structural and existential levels, well beyond politics.

We yield to the honorable and indefatigable Bill McKibben, who offers twenty three reasons why we must strike, strike and strike again:

 

Strike, because the people who did the least to cause this crisis suffer first and worst — the people losing their farms to deserts and watching their islands sink beneath the waves aren’t the ones who burned the coal and gas and oil;

Strike, because coral reefs are so gloriously beautiful and complex — and so vulnerable;

Strike, because sun and wind are now the cheapest way to generate power around the world — if we could match the political power of the fossil fuel industry, we could make fast progress;

Strike, because we’ve already lost more than half the animals on the planet since 1970 — the Earth is a lonelier place;

Strike, because our governments move with such painful slowness, treating climate change as, at worst, one problem on a long list;

Strike, because this could be a great opportunity — and maybe the last opportunity — to transform our society towards justice and towards joy. Green New Deals have been proposed around the world; they are a way forward;

Strike, because forests now seem like fires waiting to happen;

Strike, because young people have asked us to. In a well-ordered society, when kids make a reasonable request their elders should say yes — in this case with real pride and hope that the next generations are standing up for what matters;

Strike, because every generation faces some great crisis, and this is ours;

Strike, because half the children in Delhi have irreversible lung damage simply from breathing the air;

Strike, because Exxon and the rest knew all about global warming in the 1980s, and then lied so they could keep cashing in;

Strike, because what we do this decade will matter for hundreds of thousands of years;

Strike, because the temperature has hit as high as 129 F/54 C — in big cities in recent summers. The human body can survive that, but only for a few hours;

Strike, because do we want to be the first generation to leave the planet in worse shape?;

Strike, because batteries are ever cheaper — we can now store sunshine at night, and wind for a calm day;

Strike, because the UN estimates unchecked climate change could create a billion refugees by 2050;

Strike, because the big banks continue to lend hundreds of billions to the fossil fuel industry — people are literally trying to get rich off the destruction of the planet;

Strike, because what animal fouls its own nest?;

Strike, because Indigenous people around the world are trying to protect their rightful land from the coal and oil companies — and in the process protect all of us;

Strike, because every time they cut down a patch of rainforest to grow some more cows, the climate math gets harder;

Strike, because science is real, because physics exists, because chemistry matters;

Strike, so you can look your grandkid — or anyone else’s — in the eye;

Strike, because the world we were given is still so sweet.

 

 

 


Unite Behind the Science

On this day of massive participation in a global youth strike against the Great Unravelling, we are grateful to the Guardian for publishing a concise visual summary of the data confirming that our house is on fire, and that the time has come to Unite Behind the Science.

With cheers to all strikers, and their supporters:

 

EXHIBIT A

 

EXHIBIT B

 

EXHIBIT C

 

EXHIBIT D

 

EXHIBIT E

 

EXHIBIT F

 

EXHIBIT G

 

UNITE BEHIND THE SCIENCE!

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Where Grizzlies Dance

As the long-suppressed transition from a culture of extraction to a culture of connection gains momentum, there are increasingly frequent occasions to celebrate, such as the death knell for a decades-long effort by developers to brutally transform pristine and sacred wilderness into a glaciated playground for the world’s most conspicuous consumers. From the press release:

 

 

For those not familiar with the long struggle to keep Jumbo wild:

 

Fortunately, we can now change the verb tense in the first sentence above, from “is” to “was”.

 

DEFEATED MASTER PLAN FOR A JUMBO DESECRATION

 

As for the noble Griz:

 

CLICK FOR VIDEO FROM THE KTUNAXA NATION

 


Memories of Evil

We are indebted to a DP correspondent for nudging us towards a new book by Susan Neiman, provocatively titled Learning From The Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil. As we await the book’s arrival to our local independent bookstore, we relay the below excerpts from the publisher’s website. Images are from the lifelong researches of Christian Boltanski into, through and against the darkness.

 

MONUMENT 1984

TABLEAU NOIR 2007

 

ENTRE TEMPS 2004

 

SHADOWS FROM LESSONS OF DARKNESS 1987

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In an early DP post, we identified the transport of Chiricahua Apache to Florida as a prequel to the more fully articulated transport and concentration camp network that would emerge fifty five years later. So it goes.

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