Tag Archives: Human Supremacism

How We Live

Now comes DP correspondent Joseph Jackson following a week during which the mainstream media have been flooded with stories of “green jobs”, massive wind farms and other delusions of technotopian hubris, intended to assure us that the deepening climate emergency can be resolved without the slightest change in how we live.

Advance excerpts from an essay-in-progress below, with a single image added by DP.

 

 

Geomorphic Symptomology For an Emerging Addiction

 

 

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In Light of the Rotten Moon

This week, we serve to amplify indigenous voices raised in opposition to the Nevada Thacker Pass lithium mine project.

First, an excerpt from the October 1 Press release:

 

 

Second, a more general statement from the People of Red Mountain. Images added by DP, relayed from the Protect Thacker Pass website:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Back On Earth

We stay with The Ecological Citizen this week, with a plea from editor Eileen Crist to stop tying ourselves up in identity knots and stand solidly on the hard reality (and responsibility) of shared common ground. Image added by DP.

 

 

 

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The Last Stand

The non-violent civil disobedience campaign to prevent the mercenary commodification of Vancouver Island’s last remaining remnants of ancient old-growth forest continues into a new season.

Now comes Pacheedaht Elder Bill Jones with a letter written several months ago, yet with every word ringing true today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A useful chronology here.

How to help.

 

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An Endlessly Storied World

Now comes Amitav Ghosh with an exceptionally timely essay in the forthcoming issue of Orion. The entire essay (and indeed this entire issue of a revitalized/radicalized Orion) is worthy of close attention.

The closing paragraphs excerpted below, with images relayed from the website of artist Scott Hocking, documenting his 2006 installation titled Animals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About the “Animals” installation, Hocking writes:

ANIMALS is a collaborative mixed media installation of over 40 painted fiberglass animals – a response to politically correct and decorative public art contests, hosted by cities and towns worldwide. Each animal is altered based on the circumstances or environment true to that animal, and then painted in an arbitrary pc manner.

 

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Lost Fragments of Soul

In an editorial opening the recent “animals” issue of The Ecological Citizen, Eileen Crist underscores the heavy price we pay when we obscure our animal selves, and abuse our animal kin. We cannot address climate emergency without confronting the dominant ethos of human supremacism, and its dense understory of “petty mind-games.” Excerpts below, with images added by DP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Less Is More

We are grateful to a vigilant DP reader for bringing a recently published book to our attention: Less Is More, by economic anthropologist Jason Hickel.

Excerpts from a recent interview about the book below, interwoven with images from a Guggenheim Bilbao exhibition titled The Body that Carries Me, from the abundant imagination of Ernesto Neto.

From the Guggenheim Bilbao page about Neto’s exhibition:

The artist began working with crochet in 1994 in order to create seamless fabrics and has hand-crocheted circular cells—filled with plastic balls—since then. Neto prefers materials and techniques traditionally linked to women. The artist explains “I love the idea of continuity between man and woman, both in the moral sense and the psychotopological sense. Female and male are just negative and positive. It’s like a sculpture cast—you have the model and the cast. I’m pretty interested in this ambiguity.”

According to Neto, he has wanted to move through the space, hover above the floor or trace a line to climb and float in the air for many years. Life is a Body We are Part of−A vida é um corpo do qual fazemos parte, through which Neto aims to give visitors a slight sense of vertigo, encourages us to think about balance, something which we sometimes take for granted, and to reconsider “the way we move, desire, and fear.”


The Pulse of Animacy

We a grateful to a DP correspondent for reminding us of an essay by scientist, writer and citizen of the Potawatomi Nation Robin Kimmerer. First published by Orion in 2017, the essay becomes ever more relevant with each passing day. Excerpts below, interwoven with images of braided sweetgrass relayed from Whispering Wind.

 

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Ghost Forest

Now comes artist Maya Lin with an NYC Madison Square installation created from forty-nine white cedar trees transplanted from the New Jersey Pine Barrens. The project raises numerous questions, both exposing and embracing an ethos of human dominion over nature.

Image and text relayed from the project’s website, followed by a link to a documentary video.

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Hell On Earth

Now comes animal rights activist and writer Laura Bridgeton with a cogent summary critique of ever-expanding factory farms, on land and sea. Her entire report is worth close consideration. Excerpts below, with images from the fecund imagination of “outsider” artist, James Castle.

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