Category Archives: buoys

Exceptional Amnesia

Now comes the well-named environmental philosopher Melanie Challenger with an important new exploration of how human supremacism came to be the entrenched self-identity for “civilized” mammals within the less well-named species, Homo Sapiens.

An excerpt below, as relayed from the publisher’s website. Images from installations by Alisa Baremboym, relayed from her website, well worth a visit.

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That Still, Small Voice

Now comes Soul Fire Farm co-director and farm manager Leah Penniman, with two excerpts from a recent essay in prayer and praise for the gift of ecological humility vividly present within Black ecological thought, free from the death spiral of extractive white supremacism.

Images are relayed from the website of artist-scientist Juniper Harrower.

 

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About her interdisciplinary practice, Harrower writes:

As an ecologist and multimedia artist, I specialize in species interactions under climate change. I am greatly interested in the processes by which those interactions break down and their resulting environmental consequences, currently witnessed as massive species extinctions, forced migrations and the mistiming of biological events. Approaching these topics as an interdisciplinary researcher, I engage diverse communities on local and global issues to understand how ecological research that is connected to an arts practice can impact social change. […] The resultant symbolic representations and interdisciplinary narratives provide unexpected ways to engage with species and environments, encouraging a radical reimagining of our relationships as living beings on this planet.

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Unmasked

This week we bend our ears towards the Galician artist Isaac Cordal in conversation with LARB’s Brad Evans, convener of an exceptional ongoing series probing the subject of violence, in all its modulations.

Two excerpts below, with images from Cordal’s installation People of Trees, dating from the early days of the pandemic, relayed from his website.

 

 

 

 

 

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Let’s all repeat that last sentence together:

Creation and the solidarity it fosters may just be the only thing that save us.

 

 

 

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The Founding Wound

This week, we simply relay the following deep message from adrienne maree brown: poet, writer, pleasure activist, doula, wedding singer (!) and, to our ears, an essential and transformative voice beckoning us towards a viable future, if we are brave enough to live beyond the wounds and wounding: “the healing path is humility, laughter, truth, awareness and choice.”

And a few lines later: “we are our only possible medicine.” Best read out loud, and then read out loud again!

what is unveiled? the founding wound.

(poem/directive)

 

 

 

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Countdown to Zero

Now comes environmental and reproductive epidemiologist Shanna Swan, with an excerpt from her book, Countdown: How Our Modern World is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Males and Female Reproductive Development, and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race. Quite a subtitle!

As Swan convincingly documents, the toxicity of “modern” life has not only saturated the world’s oceans and most distant deserts, but has also brought polluting “externalities” into our own bodies, bringing fresh dimension to Günther Anders maxim : a world without us.

An excerpt below, as released by the publisher. Images are from the remarkable “Red Body” series by Valentina De’ Mathà, as relayed from her website.

 

 

 

 

 

Yet we are sure to cook up some clever “disruptive” tech to resolve this issue through cryonics, nano-robotic sperm, embryonics or some other hubristic device that will permit us to survive as lab-grown meat without changing a single twitch of our collective behavior. As for other species, well, they might remain available  for our entertainment and nostalgia-binges via VR and possibly even in hermetically sealed zoos and aquaria.

 

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Valentina De’ Mathà writes:

 

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Charged Disclosure

Now comes the voice of this year’s winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Louise Glück, whose quiet excellence we have long admired, and whose aversion to the “collective” tribunal in favor of precarious, accidental intimacy we most certainly share, hence our longstanding rejection of social media. Excerpts from her brief Nobel Lecture below, with the Emily D. poem, strangely (though unsurprisingly) misrepresented on the Nobel website.

 

 

Not unlike how we welcome those who find their way to DP.

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Diving Into the Flow

Now comes novelist Hari Kunzru, author of White Tears, Red Pill and Transmission, with a few illuminating thoughts regarding the social psychology of Q. The entire “Easy Chair” essay, titled Complexity, can be found in the January 2021 issue of Harper’s.

Excerpts below, with images from the artist Mike Jackson’s Birdsong series of Luminograms, relayed from the website of the Foley Gallery in NYC, where they were recently on view.

 

 

 

 

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We note that Kunzru also hosts a podcast titled Into the Zone. We jackknifed briefly into Dead Or Alive, the blurb for which states:

Life’s final border might not be so final after all. From tardigrades to viruses, some things are both dead and alive. Or neither. How do we draw the line between the living and the dead? And how does that line blur in places like in a time capsule buried in ice, or a library on the moon?

Fear not, dear DP reader: we guarantee you that there will never be a DP podcast. That ship sailed over a thousand years ago!

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Inspired To Insignificance

We are forest walkers here at DP; ramblings through local woodlands have offered deep sustenance during Covidzeit. Now comes poet & essayist J. Drew Lanham recounting varied Conversations with Trees, first published in the reliably invigorating digital pages of Wildness. A brief excerpt below, with images from Sally Mann’s Southern Landscapes series, as relayed from her website.

 

 

 

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In closing, we bend an ear to a speculative interview dating from the 1990s with a famous yet unnamed tree-whisperer, via Radical Language of Trees:

 

 

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After the Last Sky

Hard to believe, yet it has been ten years since the blossoming of dissent and creativity known as the Arab Spring. This week, we listen closely to the nuanced voice of the lawyer and writer Rayan Fakhoury, whose illuminating  Still Arab has just been published within the digital scroll of the venerable LAYB.

The essay is worthy of close consideration in its entirety; two brief excerpts below, with images of untitled paintings by Ayman Baalbaki, as relayed from the website of the Dalloul Art Foundation.

 

 

 

 

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A Heart Full of Grace

On this birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., celebrated during times of racist violence and white supremacist insurrection unleashed in the name of “American greatness”, we give full attention to one of MLK’s most powerfully transformative sermons: The Drum Major Instinct, delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

We urge close, deep listening to the entirety of the sermon; excerpts transcribed below.

 

 

 

 

We also take note of an op-ed in the Washington Post written by MLK III in opposition to the ruthless executions staged by a racist & omnicidal thanatocracy during its own dying days, with an excerpt relayed below:

 

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