Category Archives: buoys

The Thermonuclear Monarch

In the aftermath of this year’s Hiroshima Day, we offer a few excerpts from a wide-ranging interview with Elaine Scarry roaming the key themes of her book, Thermonuclear Monarchy, published (and largely ignored) five years ago.

Page images are from Shomei Tomatsu & Ken Domon’s Hiroshima-Nagasaki Document that first appeared in 1961.

 

 

 

 

 

Scarry’s ultimate prognosis?

“I don’t know if it’s going to happen this year, or whether it’s going to happen this century, but it’s almost inconceivable that nuclear war isn’t going to happen.”

 

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Unhinged

No, this week’s title does not refer back to last week’s snapshot of hubris and delusion; rather, we relay the most recent assessment of the Greenland ice sheet from a keen observer of climate collapse in the Arctic, Jason Box. Below, excerpts from today’s interview with Amy Goodman:

 

 

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Now please consider a simple graphic depiction of the number of passengers conveyed via air travel between the years 1970 and 2019, charting an increase from four hundred thousand to four billion. That’s a ten thousandfold increase, well within a single lifetime!

We no longer fly here at DP; anyone who thinks that we can address the climate emergency without dramatic and immediate changes in human behaviors is not honestly confronting the implications of the data.

 

 


Messengers of the Rope

Now come a few brief passages from a lucid December 2016 conversation with philosopher Peter Sloterdijk, as transcribed from a radio program affiliated with the Los Angeles Review of Books, Entitled Opinions.

The mission of such conversations, as described by host Robert Pogue Harrison: “To practice the persecuted religion of thinking; to think in the midst of the wasteland; to make sure the wasteland does not grow within.” Such is also the mission of DP; onwards to the Zarathustrian rope-walkers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The above three images are from the studio of Heather Pickwell. She writes:

My subject is growth, the imperceptible growth of cells, of plants; the incremental growth observed in shells and coral and the explosive growth of mutating organisms. I take my inspiration from close observation of the woods, fields and coastline of Lincolnshire. I work with natural materials – rope, wool and charcoal – these materials best reflect the physical world for me as I strive to suggest natural forms without reproducing their likeness.

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Membranes Into the Future

Now comes the voice of one our favorite writers here at DP: Robert Macfarlane. Below, brief excerpts from a. recent interview conducted in the philosophical environs of his most recent book, Underlands. Images are three iterations of Bruce Nauman’s Three Dead End Adjacent Tunnels Not Connected, dating from 1981.


 

 

 

 

 



Beyond Human Supremacism

It seems logical that reversing the vast environmental damage caused by the Great Acceleration will require an equally as forceful Great Deceleration. Yet at exactly the time when humans need to do less via dramatic contraction, both economic and biological, we prefer to sustain the delusion that we can fix the broken world with yet another spasm of frantic human activity.

This week, we relay brief excerpts from a December 2018 article by Eileen Crist that provides a concise delineation of the human supremacist self-understanding we must overcome if we are to avert the worst consequences of the deepening ecological emergency.

Images are from recent mass civil disobedience protests against the perpetuation of lignite coal mining in Germany.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Disimagination Machine

Now comes Ronald Purser, author of the recently published McMindfulness: How Mindfulness became the New Capitalist Spirituality. His recent “long read” essay in the Guardian summarizes the central thesis. The entire essay is worthy of serious consideration; we find the below excerpts particularly compelling, including a lucid description of neoliberalism’s most pernicious ideological mantra. Images are relayed from the studio of Greg Dunn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Essential Conversation

From the imperative of love springs the need to re-conceive and re-member that most essential conversation: the dialogue between humans and the rest of life.

Below, a few excerpts from a wide-ranging interview with Paul Kingsnorth, whose writing and philosophy revolves around the recuperation of stories and voices embedded within the natural world. Images represent different seasons in Natalie Jeremijenko’s MASS MOCA installation, Tree Logic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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More from the voice of Paul Kingsnorth, this time in a more recent essay relayed from his own website:

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And finally, linked through the below image, a VPRO documentary about Kingsnorth and his County Galway homestead, highly recommended for consideration:

 

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The Imperative of Love

This week, we return to our familiar motif of “inverted utopia”, a world wherein we cannot imagine the implications of our clever technologies. Such is the case in many reactions to climate catastrophe: fear not, we will invent new tech and engineer ourselves into a Green New Deal

Yet fixes that leave deep structures in place will have the same result as wrapping infected wounds with bandages without treating the infection. Without a fundamental change in the relationship between Homo Sapiens and the whole of life, ever more clever tinkering will only serve to deepen the crisis while feeding the toxic delusion that we are in control as rulers supreme. 

With this in mind, we turn to a a few passages from recent reflections made by Barbara Cecil in counterpoint to Dahr Jamail. Images are from the Sogetsu School of Ikebana.

 

 

Her closing sentence, which should be inscribed in the heavens:

The work of these times is not about saving the world but in belonging to it more fully.

 


This Blitzkrieg of Idiocy

Now come a few insights and questions from the ever-luminous Arundhati Roy, beginning with the opening paragraphs of her recent PEN America Speech.

Images are from the archive of Richard Long’s perambulatory text works.

 

 

 

 

Roy sharpened her focus on the most pressing issue of our time in a subsequent interview with Democracy Now:

 

 

 

 


From Rights To Obligations

Today, shares in a dystopic “gig economy” company (Uber) will be offered to a public apparently willing to swallow even the most outrageously distorted narrative.

Concurrently,  the CEO of one of the most toxic companies in history (Amazon) has announced his plan to “build a road in space”:  “Do we want stasis and rationing or do we want dynamism and growth? This is an easy choice. We know what we want. We just have to get busy.”

Oh my. A man apparently addicted to “getting busy.”

Earlier this week saw the release of a report documenting abundant evidence of accelerating extinction rates while craven officials licked their chops over the opportunity to drill drill drill; busy, busy, busy.

In the midst of this death dance of neoliberalism, we turn to a historian who has devoted a lifetime of research to recuperating and celebrating histories of resistance to the commodification of every living and dead thing: Peter Linebaugh.

Excerpts from a recent interview below, with images from Doris Salcedo’s “Shibboleth”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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