Commodification of the Sacred

At COP21, self-described leaders on the issue of climate change dither and bicker over where to place the deck chairs, and who should sit in what kind of deck chair, and how those deck chairs should be polished on sunny days, and where they should be stored on rainy days. Meanwhile, the iceberg floats out there in the cold Atlantic night, indifferent to such vain and senseless negotiations.

Fortunately, there are a few voices willing to confront the stark reality of the iceberg — representatives of the First Nations — including Dine and Dakota tribal activist Tom Goldtooth, a recipient of the Gandhi Peace Award. In a recent interview, Goldtooth closely examines the icy core of neoliberal omnicide; a few excerpts below.

The images are from Christi Belcourt, whose ancestry originates from the Metis historic community of Manitou Sakhigan in what is now called Alberta, Canada — home of the tar sands.

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WATER SONG

WATER SONG

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WISDOM OF THE UNIVERSE

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MEDICINES TO HELP US

MEDICINES TO HELP US

Tellingly, delegates from the First Nations, officially designated as “observers”, are not able to interfere with the deck chair party at COP21. The deep concerns of indigenous tribes are relegated to an “annex”, as discussed in an excellent report on Democracy Now.

We note that when the iceberg finally asserts its reality, a kayak will prove far more handy than a deck chair.

KAYAKS AGAINST COP21

KAYAKS AGAINST COP21


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