Tag Archives: extinction rebellion

Nothing Untouched

Now comes entomologist Diana Six, speaking her truth from the front lines of climate emergency:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

˜˜˜˜˜


From Rage to Ruckus

This week, we serve to relay and amplify excerpts and images from the manifesto of an intermedia art movement identifying as Extraction, being a collective global exclamation: ENOUGH!

Everyone can be both creator and catalyst. At a time of growing despair and paralysis, people from all backgrounds and levels of experience—from the amateur to the virtuoso—can take action. We invite everyone to join us in creating an international art ruckus.” 


Less Is More

We are grateful to a vigilant DP reader for bringing a recently published book to our attention: Less Is More, by economic anthropologist Jason Hickel.

Excerpts from a recent interview about the book below, interwoven with images from a Guggenheim Bilbao exhibition titled The Body that Carries Me, from the abundant imagination of Ernesto Neto.

From the Guggenheim Bilbao page about Neto’s exhibition:

The artist began working with crochet in 1994 in order to create seamless fabrics and has hand-crocheted circular cells—filled with plastic balls—since then. Neto prefers materials and techniques traditionally linked to women. The artist explains “I love the idea of continuity between man and woman, both in the moral sense and the psychotopological sense. Female and male are just negative and positive. It’s like a sculpture cast—you have the model and the cast. I’m pretty interested in this ambiguity.”

According to Neto, he has wanted to move through the space, hover above the floor or trace a line to climb and float in the air for many years. Life is a Body We are Part of−A vida é um corpo do qual fazemos parte, through which Neto aims to give visitors a slight sense of vertigo, encourages us to think about balance, something which we sometimes take for granted, and to reconsider “the way we move, desire, and fear.”


Let Us Hear the Crying

We are indebted to faithful DP correspondent Janet Coster, co-author of the deeply revelatory The Lure of the Ring, for sending us two quotes from Joanna Macy, as relayed from Bill Plotkin’s Nature and the Human Soul.

We further relay the first quote below, to be followed by the second next week. Image added by DP.

 

 

ALLISON SAAR, HADES D.W.P. (2016)

 

Next week: Widening Circles.

˜˜˜˜˜


Rebel For Life

This week, we simply relay select images from around the globe in strong support for the ongoing Extinction Rebellion:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

˜˜˜˜˜


Beyond Politics

Media fixation on the increasingly toxic Washington soap opera detracts from another Friday of global strikes and protests undertaken by youth movements and their supporters in response to the Great Unravelling that is taking place at eco-structural and existential levels, well beyond politics.

We yield to the honorable and indefatigable Bill McKibben, who offers twenty three reasons why we must strike, strike and strike again:

 

Strike, because the people who did the least to cause this crisis suffer first and worst — the people losing their farms to deserts and watching their islands sink beneath the waves aren’t the ones who burned the coal and gas and oil;

Strike, because coral reefs are so gloriously beautiful and complex — and so vulnerable;

Strike, because sun and wind are now the cheapest way to generate power around the world — if we could match the political power of the fossil fuel industry, we could make fast progress;

Strike, because we’ve already lost more than half the animals on the planet since 1970 — the Earth is a lonelier place;

Strike, because our governments move with such painful slowness, treating climate change as, at worst, one problem on a long list;

Strike, because this could be a great opportunity — and maybe the last opportunity — to transform our society towards justice and towards joy. Green New Deals have been proposed around the world; they are a way forward;

Strike, because forests now seem like fires waiting to happen;

Strike, because young people have asked us to. In a well-ordered society, when kids make a reasonable request their elders should say yes — in this case with real pride and hope that the next generations are standing up for what matters;

Strike, because every generation faces some great crisis, and this is ours;

Strike, because half the children in Delhi have irreversible lung damage simply from breathing the air;

Strike, because Exxon and the rest knew all about global warming in the 1980s, and then lied so they could keep cashing in;

Strike, because what we do this decade will matter for hundreds of thousands of years;

Strike, because the temperature has hit as high as 129 F/54 C — in big cities in recent summers. The human body can survive that, but only for a few hours;

Strike, because do we want to be the first generation to leave the planet in worse shape?;

Strike, because batteries are ever cheaper — we can now store sunshine at night, and wind for a calm day;

Strike, because the UN estimates unchecked climate change could create a billion refugees by 2050;

Strike, because the big banks continue to lend hundreds of billions to the fossil fuel industry — people are literally trying to get rich off the destruction of the planet;

Strike, because what animal fouls its own nest?;

Strike, because Indigenous people around the world are trying to protect their rightful land from the coal and oil companies — and in the process protect all of us;

Strike, because every time they cut down a patch of rainforest to grow some more cows, the climate math gets harder;

Strike, because science is real, because physics exists, because chemistry matters;

Strike, so you can look your grandkid — or anyone else’s — in the eye;

Strike, because the world we were given is still so sweet.

 

 

 


Heart Lines

Neoliberalism, representing the subjection of all life forms to the economic needs of a single supremacist species, incorporates a concentration of violence so extreme that resistance often appears futile. Yet, as we have long proposed, the Gandhian concept of “satyagraha” offers a viable path towards some other orientation for living on earth, an orientation based in connections and relations rather than dominance, extraction and commodification. Embracing the spirit of satyagraha, Extinction Rebellion (XR) represents the single best chance we presently have to avert irreparable and irreversible climate breakdown, with horrific implications for all species, including Homo Sapiens.

Below, excerpts from a recent essay by XR vision coordinator Skeena Finebaum-Rathor elaborating on the ethos of non-violence as both a tactic of disruption and as the direct embodiment of a deeply transformative love and respect for all life forms. When we “draw the line” against ongoing neoliberal plunder (such as opportunistically expanding resource extraction in those regions that are most vulnerable to climate collapse), it is not a line of “battle” but a line from the heart, in the spirit of compassionate self-sacrifice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Beyond Human Supremacism

It seems logical that reversing the vast environmental damage caused by the Great Acceleration will require an equally as forceful Great Deceleration. Yet at exactly the time when humans need to do less via dramatic contraction, both economic and biological, we prefer to sustain the delusion that we can fix the broken world with yet another spasm of frantic human activity.

This week, we relay brief excerpts from a December 2018 article by Eileen Crist that provides a concise delineation of the human supremacist self-understanding we must overcome if we are to avert the worst consequences of the deepening ecological emergency.

Images are from recent mass civil disobedience protests against the perpetuation of lignite coal mining in Germany.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

˜˜˜˜˜


With Ferocious Love

In full support of the extensive non-violent civil disobedience unfolding in London and throughout the world, we relay Extinction Rebellion’s  Declaration of Rebellion, together with a few images from recent actions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time is running out; in fact, there is a large volume of data that suggests that time has already run out, and that we are now in the midst of an irreversible environmental unravelling. So-called elites must be pressured to rearrange their calendars, grasp the urgency of the climate breakdown, and declare an emergency. Even then, the challenges will be staggering and relentless.

Cheers to those thousands of extinction rebels for putting their bodies on the line, in the spirit of peace, and in ferocious love for the whole of life.

˜˜˜˜˜


House On Fire

As at COP24, that shamefully inert gathering inside a former Polish coal mine towards the end of last year, the only person who made any sense whatsoever during the annual Davos Festival of the Exalted Egos: Greta Thunberg, as she broke the stupefying complacency with a concise call for urgent action towards the creation of a radically new political and economic paradigm.

The panel to which Thunberg had been invited had been scheduled to discuss “Responses to Climate Disruption”. She rejected that theme out of hand, and instead held a roomful of leather-loafered feet to the fire. Much media hubbub was generated by an economic historian who dared to suggest that the world’s ultrarich should pay their fair share of taxes; Greta’s words were treated as if someone had released a methane burp beneath the lavish buffet table.

Excerpts below, with images from a series of Scorched Earth paintings by Lynn Christine Kelly.

 

 

SCORCHED EARTH 13

 

 

SCORCHED EARTH 32

 

 

WE MUST CHANGE EVERYTHING

˜˜˜˜˜

We took note of a quote from Hermann Hesse used by Lynn Kelly on her home page, relayed below:

 

 

There is the heart of the new paradigm,

in the heart of the trees, now scorched:

the ancient law of life.